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At 6:07pm on April 21, 2010, Ellen Pham said…
TIMBER!!!

I am just stopping by to get the link to your classroom board pics, Connie, to show David et al at EFL : )

Show em how the PROS do it, elementary style!
At 11:22pm on April 19, 2010, D Americanhorse said…
Did I successfully accept your 'friend request'? See, I told you I'm way over my head via technology. Give me a word processer with spell check and I can go to town. Put me on something that requires more than that...
At 11:19pm on April 19, 2010, D Americanhorse said…
Sometimes I feel like I'm swimming in quicksand... But Lord willing, I'll keep strokin'!
At 5:19pm on April 19, 2010, Desiree Pointer Mace said…
I was actually thinking that I might invite my colleagues to join here to discuss Lemov over the summer-- what do you think?
At 2:06pm on April 15, 2010, D Americanhorse said…
Hi Connie! I've updated my profile with twitter and blog information. I'm new at this and still 'getting the bugs out'!
At 1:39pm on April 8, 2010, james bosco said…
Thanks Carrie... Actually Margaret is probably at a saturation point with Jim Bosco since she had to put up with me in all of our discussions leading up to and including the session I organized at the MacArthur DM Conference at U. of San Diego. I have high regard for Margaret as a colleague and much affection for her as a friend....even though she backed out of doing our presentation in the form of a musical performance!!! At the heart of work is the belief that we have a serious crisis in how we are educating our young people K-16 in the U.S. but my main focus is on K-12.
And I think the idea that all we need to do is get technology into our schools and this will make it right is just downright wrong. We have been saying that for 30 years but our approach in general is to do the same things we have done without technology - with technology. Technology is not like Lourdes water. Sprinkling it over what we do does not heal it. That is certainly not to deny that there there are fantastic teachers here and there doing really great work. But to use another religious metaphor...they are far too ofen like the Christians in the catacombs. While in matters of biology I am an evolutionist, I am not one on these matters. I belive we need intelligent design. But until the deity steps in ...we probably need to do this ourselves.
At 11:39am on March 21, 2010, Anthony Cody said…
Connie,
Thanks for the welcome. This looks like a cool community you are building here. I will enjoy exploring.
At 10:47am on March 15, 2010, Ethan Shirley said…
Thanks, Connie!
At 12:17pm on March 13, 2010, Desiree Pointer Mace said…
Oh, and also: One of the teachers I worked with to "go public" with her teaching when I was at the Carnegie Foundation was Heidi Lyne, who was working on a project about what it took to get portfolio assessment going at Mission Hill (Deborah Meier's Boston school, as you probably know.) Heidi's work is such a fantastic documentary of how great the learning outcomes can be for kids who are assessed according to truly authentic standards. The video (and other materials) show the process of 7th graders preparing to present their portfolios to a school committee-- I remember thinking that I was never required to think/synthesize/present like that until my own Ph.D. orals. I can't get the link to work right now, but it's usually located at http://gallery.carnegiefoundation.org/collections/castl_k12/hlyne/.
At 12:04pm on March 13, 2010, Desiree Pointer Mace said…
We've just got the robins and red-winged blackbirds back in the last couple of days-- The neighborhood I live in is right next to Lake Michigan (I'm about 2 blocks from the shore), so I imagine we're an avian migratory superhighway of sorts.
I got to tell my students about our reconnection this week! (Have I shared the NING site for that class yet? http://technologyleadershipineducation.ning.com/) I'm also working on my new book proposal for Routledge, which is aiming to talk about the ways in which teachers are learning from each other in this "flat" world-- and even before our reconnection I was planning a chapter on social networks for practicing teachers to build each other's thinking-- now I've got even more ideas, as you might imagine!
I'd love to reconnect-- sometimes planning phone or videochat can be tricky with our two young children (Simone, age 5, and Myles, age 3). I may actually come to Ann Arbor at some point in the next month or so as my dad's health has not been great, and the three of us sibs are trying to help my mom in whatever ways we can. Wow, would I love to come visit you at Emerson! :)
This really is dream-like, isn't it? My earliest students are just entering adulthood now, and only a couple have found me (not surprising, given the high poverty and violence in the neighborhood where I taught). But it was great to tell my students about what a difference it made for me to come to Emerson, and to have teachers who really helped me see myself as a deeply creative and inventive person. I only wish that every child had access to such an education, since I've become ambivalent about the term "gifted and talented." I love Ted Sizer's work showing how powerful it can be if those kinds of methods are used with "ordinary" children.
At 9:13am on March 12, 2010, Andrew said…
Experimenting with a neat site called flixtime. Here's an example of what can be done: This is a finished project from one of my students where he compiled pictures of graffiti and created a loop-based composition to match the images.

I thought you could do something similar with your nature/music projects.
At 11:59pm on February 25, 2010, David Truss said…
Hi Connie,
Thanks!
I'm here: http://dmlfns.wikispaces.com/
Not a huge amount of tech at my current school but I've got a few teachers on wiki's now.
My family just finished our Winter Break holiday in Thailand and Vietnam... a wonderful experience.
At 1:51pm on February 23, 2010, Andrew said…
Connie-Thanks. I'll take a look. Been mad busy with too many things..

1-putting together a POPS Concert with 120 students--sort of music performance meets technology meets drama...
2-Preparing for an In Service Presentation on 21st c. Literacy/Web Tools for Teaching and Learning (I scored STEM funding to be a PDP provider)
3-Invoicing Ad Clients for the MA Music News and Prepping for Editorial Board meeting and ALL STATE Music Ed conference...
4-As Yearbook Advisor, putting together the Yearbook by April 15th!
5-Logging hours towards Superintendent certification.
6-Trying to remain true to self, students and family.

Wish there was time to blog/post...It's tough to see so much good here that I can't respond to. It seems like a luxury to have that kind of time. I type this in the ONLY 38 minute break I get all day.....Not that I'm complaining.

I always appreciate your support and encouragement. Keep it up--it's not in vain. And congrats on creating such a dynamic, intelligent reflective space for Education and Educators. So needed.....

Peace.
Andrew
At 12:20pm on February 22, 2010, Charlie Sutherland said…
Thanks for your kind welcome message(s). It's truly inspiring to discover this network, and that you're behind it! Connie from Emerson! What a wonderful surprise. Just let my big sister know you're still at it...she had you in what, the fifth grade?
At 10:17am on February 11, 2010, Kendall Holland said…
Yes! I will work on corralling some of my STEPpies, and will gladly chat with you whenever about the program! I loved it and found it extremely valuable; I went back last summer and attended a week of classes with some of my old professors (Stanford Summer Teaching Institute) and LOVED getting back into discussions of the theory of a teaching practice.

It was wonderful to see the older students mentoring the younger on Tuesday. I know most of your girls only through basketball, and greatly enjoyed seeing another facet of their personalities.
At 2:41pm on January 12, 2010, Amy Quon said…
thank you so much for the winter weather tips!! With all the layers I've been wearing, I bet I could sled down a hill on my back and barely feel the bumps in the ground :P I will definitely try out your fabric suggestions.

Lynn and I are planning to get the blog connection thing sorted out shortly, and I am looking forward to exploring more of the ning, sharing PZ happenings and GoodWork tidbits while learning about what all the other members or working on/interested in. Thanks for such a warm welcome!
At 11:52am on January 10, 2010, Nathan Lowell said…
Ravenwood is a good start. Six episodes (about 3 hrs) have been released, there's another 90 minutes in the pipeline and there will be 16 in all when I wrap it up in a week or so.

Ravenwood is fantasy. The rest are all science fiction.
At 10:36pm on January 7, 2010, ddeubel said…
Connie,

G'day! Just passing on this public letter about HSGE - have you seen it?
http://www.schoolsmatter.info/2010/01/calling-out-harvard.html
At 10:58am on January 6, 2010, Laura Gibbs said…
My take on this is that capital letters, since they are a feature of written speech only and not spoken speech, are going to get totally destabilized in the coming decades, just like punctuation is getting destabilized, too. In school we assume that written language is the main point of reference.... but that's such a schoolroom phenomenon - and the role of written language is diminishing in our multimedia world. There was a REALLY great article about the diminishing use of Braille in the blind community - it was in NYTimes a few days ago, did you see it? Very profound issues about writing in general:
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/03/magazine/03Braille-t.html
At 5:59pm on January 5, 2010, Laura Gibbs said…
Oh Connie, I think about this ALL the time. Capitalization of titles is one of the things that varies most from country to country (not all scripts even have lower-case and upper-case letters, of course) - this past year I did several "Aesop" articles for various encyclopedia projects, a couple in England, one in Germany and two in America and EACH ONE had different rules for capitalization of items in the bibliography. Go figure!!!
If you want to show your students how dramatically this kind of thing has evolved, you can see totally wacky capitalization rules not just in titles but even in plain English prose from say the 16th or 17th century at GoogleBooks - just as in German even today nouns are capitalized, we could have gone that way in English, too - just look at the capitalization in this late 17th-century Aesop:
LINK
:-)

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